Claude Watson
1944/1948 Presidential Candidate
1936 VP Candidate

An unsigned obituary in the March, 1978 edition of The National Statesman says:
     Dr. Claude A. Watson, Prohibition Presidential Nominee in 1944 and 1948, went to his eternal reward on January 3, 1978.  Ninety-two years of age, Mr. Watson leaves behind Mrs. Maude L. Watson, 2 children, 10 grandchildren, and three great-grandchildren.
     A michigan native, Mr. Watson graduated from Alma College and served as a Free Methodist pastor and conference superintendent.  He moved to California and established a very successful law practice there.  He was licensed to practice before the Federal and US Supreme courts.
     In 1936, he was the Prohibition Vice-Presidential Nominee, running with Dr. D. Leigh Colvin.  In 1944 and 1948, he carried the banner as the Presidential Nominee.  He gained nationwide publicity in 1944, when he questioned why President Roosevelt would not let him have the priority rights needed in wartime for air passage.  When reporters asked Mr. Roosevelt, Mr. Watson got his air tickets.  In 1948, he because the first US presidential nominee to fly his own campaign plane,... and he sent Mrs. Watson on a well publicized trip to the White House to measure for drapes, etc.  in case they moved in after the election.
     Dr. Watson's well-reasoned speeches attracted many to the party and among those are many who are leaders, today."

Dr. Claude A. Watson died on 3 January 1978.  He was 92.  His wife, Maude, 2 children, 10 grand-children, and 3 great grand-children survived him.
     A Michigan native, Watson graduated from Alma College and was a Free Methodist pastor and conference superintendent.  He later moved to California and practiced law.
     He was the Prohibition Vice-Presidential candidate in 1936, running with D. Leigh Colvin.  In the elections of 1944 and 1948, he was the Prohibition Presidential candidate.   Watson was the first Presidential candidate to fly his own airplane while campaigning.  He gained nationwide publicity in 1944 when he questioned why President Roosevelt would not let him have the priority rights needed in war time for airline travel; when reporters asked FDR, Watson got his tickets.
     Watson's most memorable campaign gambit was sending his wife to the White House, to measure for new drapes just in case they were able to move in after the election.
      Dr. Watson's well-reasoned speeches attracted many newcomers to the Prohibition Party, including some of today's (1978) leaders.
                                                  -- Earl F. Dodge (paraphrased)


  
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